Going Organic – Home Gardening

The Rain Forest Rescue Network has set up a page about home gardening. They have presented a detailed ‘How To’ guide to get you growing in no time!

To read in full visit: http://www.rainforestrescueinternational.org/rri/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=76&Itemid=83

Here are some delightful home recipes that make great use of all your hard work:

Elawalu kiri hodhi (vegetable curry)
This is a basic white curry recipe. It’s great for vegetables like beans, pumpkin, okra, potatoes and zucchini. 

 
Serves 4

– 3 cups thin coconut milk

– 1 medium onion, thinly sliced

– 2 fresh green chillies seeded and split

– Half a teaspoon ground turmeric

– 2 cloves of garlic, finely sliced

– ½  finely grated fresh ginger

– A cinnamon stick

– 4 pieces of dried daun pandan

– 1 stalk of lemongrass

– 8 curry leaves

– 1 ½ lb of vegetables, slices

– 1 cup of thick coconut milk

– Salt to taste

Put all the ingredients except the sliced vegetables, salt and thick coconut milk, in a large saucepan and simmer gently, uncovered for approximately 10mins. Add the sliced vegetables and salt and cook gently until the vegetables are tender. Add thick coconut milk and simmer about 5mins longer. Serve with rice and other curries.

Pipinja sambol: (cucumber sambol)


– 2 small green cucumbers

– 2 teaspoons of salt

– ½ cup thick coconut milk

– 1freshed chilli, seeded and sliced

– 1 fresh green chilli, seeded and sliced

– 1 small onion, cut thinly

– 2 tablespoons of lemon juice


Peel the cucumbers and slice very thinly. Put in a bowl, sprinkle with salt and let stand for at least 30mins. Press out all the liquid and rinse with cold water. Drain well. Mix with remaining ingredients and serve as an accompaniment to a curry meal.

Watakka curry (yellow pumpkin curry)

 
Serves 6

– 1lb of pumpkin

– 1 small onion, finely chopped

– 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

– 3 fresh green chillies, seeded and chopped

– 8-10 curry leaves

– ½ teaspoon of fenugreek seeds

– ½ teaspoon of ground turmeric

– 2 teaspoons pounded Maldive fish

– 1 ½ cups of thin coconut milk

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– ½ cup of thick coconut milk

– 1 teaspoon of black mustard seeds


Peel the pumpkin and cut into large chunks. Put it into a pan with all the ingredients except the thick coconut milk and mustard seeds. Bring slowly to simmering point and cook gently, uncovered until the pumpkin is almost tender. Meanwhile, grind the mustard seeds in a mortar and pestle and mix with the thick coconut milk. Add to the simmering pot and cook for five minutes longer on a very gentle heat.

Mallung (shredded green leaves with coconut)

 
Serves 6

– 2 cups of finely shredded green leaves

– 1 medium onion, finely chopped

– 2 green chillies, seeded and chopped

– ½ teaspoon ground turmeric

– 2 teaspoons pounded Maldive fish

– 2 tablespoons of lemon juice

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– 2-3 tablespoons of freshly grated or desiccated coconut.


Put the leaves into a saucepan with all other ingredients except coconut. Add a sprinkling of water and stir well, cover and cook over medium heat for about 6 minutes. Uncover, add coconut and toss over a low heat until the coconut absorbs all the liquid. Remove from heat, and serve hot or cold with rice.

Badhapu wambatu sambol (fried eggplant sambol)


– 2 eggplants

– 2 teaspoons of salt

– 2 teaspoons of ground turmeric oil for frying

– 3 fresh green chillies

– 2 small onions

– Lemon juice

– 3 tablespoons of thick coconut milk.


Slice the eggplant thinly, rub with salt and turmeric, put in a bowl and leave for at least one hour. Drain off the liquid and dry the eggplant on paper towels. Fry the eggplant in hot oil and drain again on absorbent paper. Mix with seeded and chopped chillies, finely sliced onion, lemon juice to taste and 3 tablespoons of thick coconut milk.

Not that I’m a control freak, but it’s a great feeling to have complete control over your food. You look over its journey from plot (or in my case pot) to plate and can rest assured it’s seen no nasty chemicals along the way. So off you go… experiment with your cooking and enjoy your food; you’ve worked hard for it after all.

 This article was researched and written by RRI volunteer Lydia Downs.

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